10 THINGS WE’D LOVE TO SEE MORE OF IN AMERICAN INDEPENDENT FILMS

…So we’ve been watching a lot of American independent films recently. All genres, budgets ranging from $100-$10,000,000 (nevermind if we should really call that indie). For one of us, watching indie films is part of our job. When you look at a large sample of things that hang together, naturally you start to see patterns. We thought it might be fun, helpful, infuriating to list 10 things that were conspicuously absent from the sample but that we really wish weren’t. We invite you–nay, we implore you!–to add your own items to the list by dropping us a line or a comment. (Note: these 10 things have nothing to do with marketing or technology–there are more than enough of other places for thinking about filmmaking that way…). Anyway, so, here’s what we got:

1) Different mistakes.

2) Ambition in the right place. When did filmmakers stop making personal films that are not about themselves (but about the big themes of the day)?

3) Frank treatment of sex and sexuality (this does not require graphic material).

4) More like a symphony, less like a story.

5) Moments of real and uncalculated grace or spontaneity or mystery.

6) An understanding of the true cost of redemption or restoration.

7) Images that show a filmmaker is seeing not just telling.

8) Kinetic energy.

9) The use of actually original original scores or collaborations between filmmakers and avant-garde, progressive, or underground musicians.

10) A sense of evil.

4 responses to “10 THINGS WE’D LOVE TO SEE MORE OF IN AMERICAN INDEPENDENT FILMS

  1. Pingback: 10 THINGS WE’D LOVE TO SEE MORE OF IN AMERICAN INDEPENDENT FILMS | F U G I T I V E | cinema | Winter Film Awards·

  2. We got this great comment via Facebook from New York actor, Theodore Bouloukos to the above post. Thanks, Theo!
    Theodore wrote: “I’d love to see more of the best actors (those deemed ‘has-beens’) offered challenging roles in indie films, simultaneously resurrecting their careers and giving them currency anew; to say nothing of their adding cachet to these projects. Surely Tuesday Weld has something left to give, no? I could name a dozen others but you get the picture. Comb the Academy Award nominees from the ’60s and ’70s and you’ll find a veritable trove of talent no longer seen but alive and well otherwise. The biggest offender is the Oscar telecast, which, when I was growing up, was a parade of then and now; today, they trot out presenters I’ve never even heard of. It’s obscene.”

  3. Pingback: THE PURGATORY OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: ELIZA HITTMAN’S IT FELT LIKE LOVE | F U G I T I V E | cinema·

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